People’s Needs

To defend democracy in the West and spread it overseas, we need to remember Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: I believe there is no sign of revolution in China and Vietnam because these governments have been very competent at increasing the security of basic needs.

Often we get lost in debates about abstract values such as . . . → Read More: People’s Needs

Talent Retention in China: HR and General Management Aspects (Part III)

人才保留 [réncáibǎoliú] Talent Retention

This blog entry is a follow-up entry to Talent Retention in China:Some Suggestions for the Western Executive and Talent Retention in China:The Socio-Cultural Aspects.

Multinational Corporation (MNC) in China face employee expectations in the HR and General Management that are different from their home country. By integrating some of the more common Chinese HR and . . . → Read More: Talent Retention in China: HR and General Management Aspects (Part III)

Talent Retention in China: The Socio-Cultural Aspects (Part II)

人才保留 [réncáibǎoliú] Talent Retention

This blog entry is a follow-up entry to Talent Retention in China: Some Suggestions for the Western Executive and covers the socio-cultural aspects that Western executives in China should be aware of order to enhance employee retainment and commitment in their organisation.

In China, as anywhere, people want to be treated well by their employer and . . . → Read More: Talent Retention in China: The Socio-Cultural Aspects (Part II)

Talent Retention in China: Suggestions for the Western Executive (Part I)

人才保留 [réncáibǎoliú] Talent Retention

With the labour shortage and ever increasing labour costs in China, what can Multinational Corporations (MNCs) consider beyond offering attractive salaries that might threatens their competitiveness?

The trick to improve talent retention is to build a committed as opposed to a satisfied (or worse) workforce and I believe there are certain aspects where Western . . . → Read More: Talent Retention in China: Suggestions for the Western Executive (Part I)

My Favorite Chinese Mandarin Learning Apps

学中文 [xuézhōngwén] Learn Chinese

Here are my favorite Chinese Mandarin learning apps.

 

StickyStudy

This $4 app is easily the best Flashcard function out there. The Leitner Study Method algorithm works beautifully to introduce, rehearse and re-enforce vocabulary. The HSK levels are complete and well edited. Very nice and the best way to build your Chinese Mandarin vocabulary. Comes with both Traditional . . . → Read More: My Favorite Chinese Mandarin Learning Apps

Comparison: Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurs

企业家 [qǐyèjiā] Entrepreneur

In the La Trobe GSM subject ‘Entrepreneurial Business Planning’, Kama Knudsen and I researched and presented and compared and contrasted the definitions of a Small Business Owner and an Entrepreneur.

Below is the summary of this research:

 

Defining The Small Business Owner

An individual who establishes, independently owns & manages a business . . . → Read More: Comparison: Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurs

Bennis’s theory of Leaders versus Managers

Leaders vs. Managers 领导者与管理者 lǐngdǎozhěyǔguǎnlǐzhě

 

 

Bennis’s theory of Leaders versus Managers

The manager administers; the leader innovates.

The manager is a copy; the leader is an original.

The manager maintains; the leader develops.

The manager accepts reality; the leader investigates it.

The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people.

The manager . . . → Read More: Bennis’s theory of Leaders versus Managers

Love Simplified: 愛 vs. 爱

Love missing a heart 爱缺一个心 àiquēyīgexīn

What’s up with Simplified Chinese character of 爱 (ài- love) missing the 心 (xīn – heart) radical?

I’d much rather see a heart in love (心) as in the Traditional character for love (愛).

The history of character simplification is quite interesting. It started with the New Culture Movement (xīnwénhuàyùndòng – 新文化运动) in the beginning of the 20th . . . → Read More: Love Simplified: 愛 vs. 爱

Protected: China manufacturing company for sale

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Chinese Negotiations: The Importance of Face

Negotiate 谈判 [tánpàn] David Petersson 潘德伟

Most Westerners are aware of the importance of giving and receiving face (面子 or miànzi). With this blog I would like to point out some important aspects of during business negotiations in China.

 

In China, a person’s reputation and social standing relies on saving face. A Westerner who fails to do so, even unintentionally, . . . → Read More: Chinese Negotiations: The Importance of Face